Blogs

The Windrush fiasco is now being portrayed as a slip-up in the delivery if an otherwise good policy. It is much worse than that. The flaw lies in the policy itself – the deliberate cultivation of a 'really hostile environment" for anyone in the country illegally'.

When plans for war are hatched in the context of promises 'to make America great again', western statesmen ought to take a deep breath and consider the wisdom of Augustine and Thomas Aquinas

The long and frustrating search for a solution to the Syrian problem cannot succeed unless it takes into account that at the heart of the conflict is a religious quarrel roughly 1,400 years old. Peace in the region is only likely to come about if Muslims of both persuasions can agree to live with their differences

11 April 2018 | by Charles Hampton

Zimbabwe draws breath, but how fresh is the air?

Charles Hampton, who worked in Zimbabwe between 1980 and 1984, visits the country in the aftermath of Robert Mugabe's removal from power

Julie Sarti went to Zambia as one of four people selected from Oxfam’s committed supporters to see first-hand how donations are spent. She came away encouraged, inspired and reassured

02 April 2018 | by Louise Cowley

The timeless wonder of the Shroud of Turin

Louise Cowley on visiting the Shroud: 'This strange sense of a presence that occupied my being, grew, refusing to be ignored as did my excitement as I gained some small sense of what I was about to see and yet could not grasp its magnitude.'

23 March 2018 | by Ahlaam Moledina

I Was a Stranger and You Made Me Welcome

Ahlaam Moledina (16) has won the Columbans’ young journalists print competition on the theme, ‘Migrants are our Neighbours’. She is a pupil of Bishop Challoner Catholic College in Birmingham. This is her winning entry.

On Down's Syndrome Day, Bernadette Kehoe writes about her late brother-in-law, an example of how to rise above drawbacks and to overcome adversity. A life remembered by so many.

20 March 2018 | by John Arnold

Immersed in the sound of silence on Lindisfarne

For most people, there is probably a very reasonable assumption that prayer is best achieved, or more easily achieved, in a place of silence such as Lindisfarne. But prayer is also needed in places such as Bangladesh

Daniel O'Leary explains how Patrick’s understanding of Incarnation enabled him to discern within the evolutionary stage of pagan worship, the common ground of God’s presence.


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