Arts

Remember, remember Premium

19 October 2017 | by Joanna Moorhead
We know what happened, and when, but it seems not why. A new show sheds light

Gallows humour Premium

19 October 2017 | by Anthony Quinn
A hideously funny take on Soviet life

Untruth to power Premium

19 October 2017 | by Mark Lawson
What politicians and lovers do best

Anthems for grown-ups Premium

19 October 2017 | by Brian Morton
Trio of albums still at the top of the tree

Get thee to a nunnery Premium

11 October 2017 | by Lucy Lethbridge
Culture clash in the cloister

Drinking in the messages Premium

11 October 2017 | by Anna Moore
Stations of Water, St Paul’s Cathedral, London

Sacred made simple Premium

11 October 2017 | by Alexandra Coghlan
An opera in church vestments

Study in arrogance Premium

11 October 2017 | by Mark Lawson
Enoch’s ghost haunts today’s politics

Music in the genes Premium

11 October 2017 | by D.J. Taylor
Dancing to the same tune

Monastic gems Premium

05 October 2017 | by Joanna Moorhead
A sleepy market town in County Durham, Barnard Castle, holds one of the best collections of Spanish religious art in Britain. And right now these jewels, plus two remarkable Goyas, are on show in London at the Wallace Collection.

A monk’s Brexit Premium

05 October 2017 | by Lucy Lethbridge
First-rate information delivered while giving us the strangely pleasurable sensation of being rapped over the knuckles and made to sit up straight.

From the adolescent heart Premium

05 October 2017 | by D.J. Taylor
Teen musings both funny and sad

Operatic rollercoaster Premium

05 October 2017 | by Robert Thicknesse
Four hundred years of songs for Europe

Neatly pressed Premium

05 October 2017 | by Mark Lawson
Young bloods transfer to West End.

Beauty behind pain Premium

27 September 2017 | by Laura Gascoigne
Kathe Kollwitz, the people’s printmaker, gets a long-overdue retrospective

Make-up and mend Premium

27 September 2017 | by Mark Lawson
An oblique take on the October 1966 Aberfan disaster in South Wales

Unbroken hearts Premium

27 September 2017 | by Robert Thicknesse
A new production that is a bit too studied

Future tense Premium

27 September 2017 | by Lucy Lethbridge
Strange but hauntingly plausible sci-fi

Light programmes Premium

27 September 2017 | by D.J. Taylor
Radio 2 marks its fiftieth birthday

Khovanshchina is packed with dramatic choruses, hymns, supplications and laments, hypnotic scenes of mystic visions, exotic dances, serene, folky paintings of nature to frame the often hideous human action.

Double fault: courting disappointment Premium

21 September 2017 | by Anthony Quinn
It is one of the defining rivalries of tennis, which culminated in the memorable ding-dong of the Wimbledon men’s final in 1980.

This was a coronation of sorts – but with anticipation so high, let-down was perhaps inevitable.

Face the facts Premium

21 September 2017 | by D.J. Taylor
A fascinating insight into the ancient art of making death masks

Unlikely couplings Premium

21 September 2017 | by Lucy Lethbridge
The way we live, and love, now

The show celebrates 20 years of the Bethlem Gallery, set up in 1997 to showcase the work of current and former patients and now housed in an imposing art deco building.

Is The Tablet recommending Ter Agios Numini for your home stereo or iPod? Well, with some caution, yes, but imagine the cred and kudos among goth-y nephews that it might gain.

Work on this painstaking account of Britain’s efforts to “build decent social housing” over the past century and a half was well advanced before the Grenfell tragedy gave most of its underlying themes a dreadful contemporary focus.

The revival of Loot that marks five decades since the writer’s death is the first performance with all the blue-pencil marks erased. Even in its bowdlerised form, the drama was calculated to have many theatregoers’ eyebrows touching the auditorium roof.

Upstart Crow is another of Ben Elton’s funny forays into the foreign country of the past, where the great figures and events of history are thoroughly cut down to size.

Did he choose, or was he chosen? How far was Judas really responsible for his betrayal of Christ?

Theatre productions roughly divide between the kind that make the writer famous – new with original style or content – and those that encourage celebration of the director: surprising interpretations of well-known works.

Anyone hoping that a drama entitled Doctor Foster might involve a jaunt to Gloucester and a shower of rain may wish to retire gracefully with a good book.

Art and soul: an interior journey Premium

07 September 2017 | by Laura Gascoigne
The late-Victorian houses in my street are increasingly being “modernised” by new owners who transform their interiors into blank white boxes, unrelieved by pictures or decorative objects: in a word, soulless.

Ode to endurance: a poet who pleased Premium

07 September 2017 | by D.J. Taylor
Knowing how the Radio 4 commissioning editors go about their business, I couldn’t quite work out how Richard Holmes’s celebration of the genius of John Keats (3 September) got the committee’s nod.

Refreshment at the Jesus Arms Premium

31 August 2017 | by Joanna Moorhead
Fun and music at Britain’s biggest faith festival

Setting the record straight Premium

31 August 2017 | by Anthony Quinn
In the wake of events at Charlottesville, Virginia, Kathryn Bigelow’s historical drama Detroit could hardly be more topical.

Delicious as ever Premium

31 August 2017 | by Lucy Lethbridge
New team delivers the baked goods

i-Messiah Premium

31 August 2017 | by Mark Lawson
Hi-tech meets the gospels

Toilet humour Premium

31 August 2017 | by D.J. Taylor
Does class still matter?

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