Arts

Nick and Margaret: Too Many Immigrants? Premium

17 July 2014 | by John Morrish

 
Nick Hewer and Margaret Mountford, Lord Sugar’s erstwhile Apprentice sidekicks, have developed a highly marketable double act, and this week (15 and 16 July) they used it to cast light – or to direct heat – on a highly inflammable area of British life.They took five sets of anti-immigration British citizens (all but one of them white) to London and introduced them to five sets of legal immigrants to compare notes. Nick and Margaret hammed up scripted arguments in taxicabs, chatted to the participants and took turns to read the voice-over. People were greeted on doorsteps, tea was drunk and there was a lot of terrible bouncy music. It was a bit like daytime TV, but with conflict. The personal encounters were also required to illustrate themes in the immigration discussion




Subscribe now and enjoy access to all parts of the tablet website, Including its 175 year archive...
Subscribe


Article List


TABLET WORLD…
Latest Issue

Digital/PDF Version

PDF version (iPad-friendly)

Previous Issues
Latest Tweet
Most Read Articles

German bishops abandon controversial Missal translation09 October 2017 by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt

German bishops abandon controversial Missal translation09 October 2017 by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt

Change Catholic teaching to make death penalty 'inadmissible', says Pope12 October 2017 by Christopher Lamb

Change Catholic teaching to make death penalty 'inadmissible', says Pope12 October 2017 by Christopher Lamb

Pro Francis theologians start petition in support of Pope following 'filial correction' 18 October 2017 by Christopher Lamb

Pro Francis theologians start petition in support of Pope following 'filial correction' 18 October 2017 by Christopher Lamb

Martin Luther’s new religion: Luther’s teaching on justification by faith alone demanded a complete reshaping of ChristianityPremium11 October 2017 by Richard Rex

Changing minds and hearts: the basic moral test of a society and its laws is the treatment of human life at its most vulnerablePremium18 October 2017 by John Wilson

Royal escape: historian and uncle to Princes William and Harry, Charles SpencerPremium11 October 2017 by Joanna Moorhead

Martin Luther’s new religion: Luther’s teaching on justification by faith alone demanded a complete reshaping of ChristianityPremium11 October 2017 by Richard Rex

Changing minds and hearts: the basic moral test of a society and its laws is the treatment of human life at its most vulnerablePremium18 October 2017 by John Wilson

Royal escape: historian and uncle to Princes William and Harry, Charles SpencerPremium11 October 2017 by Joanna Moorhead

Share Us
Tablet Subscription

Manage my subcription here

Manage
Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter

Sign Up
Top