News

Church of England picks team to play Vatican in cricket match

28 August 2014 | by Katherine Backler

The Church of England has selected the cricket team that will take on the Vatican in September in a match to raise awareness of human trafficking and fundraise for the Anglican-Roman Catholic anti-trafficking initiative, the Global Freedom Network.

Both Churches have aimed for a blend of innocence and experience on their teams, selecting mostly ordinands with a couple of older priests on each side to contribute cricketing and clerical wisdom.

Anglican newspaper The Church Times admits that the odds favour the Vatican team, which has the advantage of a wider geographical spread - the Catholic side includes a number of ordinands from the Indian subcontinent, who are currently studying in Rome. When the team visits the UK this September, they will play four practice matches together, while the Anglican side will play together only once before the match. The Church Times cautions that:  “No theological or ecclesiological deductions should be made from these different approaches.”

The CofE’s opening bowler will be Revd Rob Glenny, Assistant Curate of St Nicolas’, Old Marston, Oxford. Revd Glenny, 24, told The Church Times that his best cricketing experience was “sitting down in pub with club team for a well-earned pint after a hard-fought victory, and a non-churchgoing teammate asking: 'Rob, if all Christians believe in God, why do you need so many denominations?' My worst cricketing experience was not really having a good answer."

The match will take place at Kent County Cricket Club in Cantebury on 19 September beginning at 4pm. Attendance is free, but a collection for the Global Freedom Network will be taken afterwards.



Article List


TABLET WORLD…
Latest Issue

Digital/PDF Version

PDF version (iPad-friendly)

Previous Issues
Latest Tweet
Most Read Articles

Both sides in Amoris Laetitia debate are right, says Cardinal Müller19 October 2017 by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt

Pro Francis theologians start petition in support of Pope following 'filial correction' 18 October 2017 by Christopher Lamb

German bishops abandon controversial Missal translation09 October 2017 by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt

Both sides in Amoris Laetitia debate are right, says Cardinal Müller19 October 2017 by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt

Pro Francis theologians start petition in support of Pope following 'filial correction' 18 October 2017 by Christopher Lamb

German bishops abandon controversial Missal translation09 October 2017 by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt

Changing minds and hearts: the basic moral test of a society and its laws is the treatment of human life at its most vulnerablePremium18 October 2017 by John Wilson

The book of the people: the laity were reading the scriptures before 1517Premium18 October 2017 by Thomas Kaufmann

When realities collide: A pro-life activist suggests a change of direction for those campaigning for the abolition of the Abortion ActPremium18 October 2017 by Rebecca Bratten Weiss

Changing minds and hearts: the basic moral test of a society and its laws is the treatment of human life at its most vulnerablePremium18 October 2017 by John Wilson

The book of the people: the laity were reading the scriptures before 1517Premium18 October 2017 by Thomas Kaufmann

When realities collide: A pro-life activist suggests a change of direction for those campaigning for the abolition of the Abortion ActPremium18 October 2017 by Rebecca Bratten Weiss

Share Us
Tablet Subscription

Manage my subcription here

Manage
Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter

Sign Up
Top